Reading at 14th Street Y

The New York Writers Coalition has created a chapbook called “Echoes of Our Time” that includes three of my stories that have been posted on My Italian Scrapbook.  These are “Grimaldi’s Thanksgiving” posted in November 2015, “The Entrepreneur” posted in August 2015, and “Memories of Childhood” posted in June of 2015.

The best part is that there will be a book-launch, at which I along with other writers will read their work.  The launch is free and open to the public.  And there will be refreshments after the readings.

It is to be held at The 14th Street Y, 344 East 14th Street (between 1st and 2nd Avenues) on Monday, January 9 from 12 to 2 pm.

I would be delighted to meet you there.

Presentation of “Ciao, Napoli” in April and May

I have been invited to present Ciao, Napoli at following venues:

the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum

420 Tompkins Avenue | Staten Island, NY 10305

on Saturday, April 23, 2016

at 2:00 pm

For additional information, please contact the Museum

p: 718-442-1608 | info@garibaldimeuccimuseum.org

http://pub1.andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-home.cgi?d=garibaldi-meucci-museum

and

the American Italian Cultural Roundtable, Inc.

on Thursday, May 26, 2016

at 6:30 pm

at

Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimo

24 West 12th Street | New York, NY 10011

This event is free to members of AICR and $15 for non-members

Light refreshments are included

For additional information please contact

Commendatore Aldo Mancusi

718-368-3993

amancusi@enricocarusomuseum.con

 

About Ciao, Napoli

IMG_0699 Body of Naples Statue
The Body of Naples statue in Via Nilo

A few years ago, my husband Jim and I decided to spend an extended period of time in Italy and learn Italian.  After doing some research, we chose to go to Naples.  Our friends thought we were either mad or daring to that about living there for a year, but we wanted to avoid the romanticized landscapes of recent popular destination literature.

Naples was not what we had expected.  We found a city both familiar and strange.  Known for its art, ancient ruins, suspect characters, and ubiquitous piles of garbage, the Naples of conventional travel guides was immediately present when we arrived.  As we roamed the city, seeking out the notable sites, we found much more.  Works of art could be seen in any corner; traditions continued to be a part of local street life; people were welcoming, helpful and curious about us.  Visually the streets of Naples were as strange and evocative as those of Venice.  History constantly poked out from beneath surfaces.

Our friends back home wanted to know what Naples was like — in pictures and in words.  We responded by sending monthly newsletters trying to portray our experiences.  When we returned, I continued to study Italian with Mariella Bonavita at the Garibaldi Museum.  Mariella read some of our newsletters and encouraged me to use them to  create a personal journal.  The result is Ciao, Napoli  A Scrapbook of Wandering in Naples.

Presentation of CIAO, NAPOLI at Bella Italia Mia on November 22, 2015

I have been asked to present Ciao, Napoli at Bella Italia Mia on November 22, 2015 at 12:00 pm.  Bella Italia Mia meets once the third Sunday of each month at Christ the King High School, 68-02 Metropolitan Avenue, Middle Village, NY.  Their telephone number is 718 416 1240.

I am excited about my upcoming event and invite any and all who would like to attend.  There is a $7 admission charge, which includes a buffet of Italian delights, wine and dessert and coffee.

Here is an excerpt from Ciao, Napoli :

Visually, Naples is a dark dream. Like a dream it is cluttered with artifacts from the past. Remnants of now dead civilizations poke out from surfaces. Faces of gods or demons greet you as you walk down the streets. Fountains and carvings are everywhere.

Blue Fountain in the Historic Center
Blue Fountain in the Historic Center

The streets are narrow, made of uneven, loose stones. Since Naples claims to have had stone streets when the streets of London and Paris were dirt, the streets of Naples must be paved with the oldest stones in Europe. Bits of grass grow in the cracks of the walls. Vines climb the walls. The streets are littered with discarded wrappers, water bottles, cigarettes.

 

However, if you are lucky, when you peer into the courtyard at Palazzo San Felice,you will see an intriguing face carved into a stone wall.

IMG_0240 Face with Chain

Not only are carvings of gods or demons everywhere, but angels are hiding in alleyways. If you are adventurous and poke your head around a dark and crumbling wall on Vicolo Gigante in the centro storico, you may be startled by the looming presence of this angel waiting to warn passersby, but of what we can only imagine.

 

Blue Angel  Painted by an unknown artist on a wall in the Historic Center
Blue Angel
Painted by an unknown artist